How to Size a Goalie Helmet

how to size a goalie helmet goalie mask with sizing charts for bauer ccm vaughn warrior sportmask coveted mask

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    The most important piece of equipment in a goalie’s bag is the helmet. Protecting the head, as we have seen in sports over the years, is crucial to maintaining proper health in sport. It is important to ensure the helmet is fitted properly so that it can do it’s job and protect the head as it was designed to do, because we all know that players love to hit the head in warm-ups.

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    There are a few things to look for to ensure that everything fits properly. The helmet is able to be adjusted to a certain degree, but has its limitations. The chin cup and the straps that hold the back plate in place are the two adjustable areas on the helmet. A few things to look for when checking the fit of helmet are as follows:

    Ensure the forehead rests comfortably against the sweatband. The helmet should not be so low that the top part of the front opening is sitting on the eyebrows or lower. This indicates the helmet is too big. Alternatively, the helmet should not be resting on top of the crown of the head, exposing the forehead in the front opening of the helmet. This indicates the helmet is too small.

    The backplate of the helmet should fit snug against the back of the helmet, or just slightly inside the back opening of the helmet. If there is any exposure of the back of the head between the back of the helmet and the backplate, the helmet is too small. If the back plate straps have to be tightened so much that the back plate is well inside the helmet, the helmet is too big. A rough ballpark for how much the backplate can suck into the helmet would be no more than one inch.


    Gaps between the backplate and the helmet that show parts of the head indicate that the helmet is too small.

    The inner sides of the helmet should fit snugly against the cheeks and temple. There should be no gaps between the inner foam and the side of the face. If so, the helmet is too big. However, if the goalie feels uncomfortable because there is too much pressure from the helmet being placed on the side of the face, the helmet is too small.

    Adjust the chin cup in the helmet to sit snugly against the chin

    Ensure no gaps are present between the forehead and the front sweatband area of the helmet. If there are, try tightening the back plate straps. If the back plate becomes sucked inside the back of the helmet more than one inch, the helmet is too small.

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    Do a shake test with the helmet tightened securely on the goalie. Get them to shake their head and see if the mask moves around. It should be snug and secure and stay in place on the goalie’s head. An alternative is to hold the cage of the helmet tight with your hand and get the goalie to shake their head. If there is a lot of movement within the helmet, the helmet is too big and either requires adjustment, or a smaller size.

    Do a fit test of the helmet while wearing a chest protector to ensure that the chin of the helmet does not get caught on any chest protector padding. Ensure the goalie can move their head freely, and if not, look at adjusting the chest protector, or looking at a different manufacturer or model of helmet as they are all designed with different chin lengths and shapes.

    Just as a side note not really related to fit, DO NOT SKIMP ON COST, the lower models provide less protection. Ensure that your goalie is in an adequate helmet for the level of shots they are facing. Also ensure the helmet has the proper certifications to be used in your league of play. Cat-eye cages are not accepted in most leagues, especially minor hockey, as they are not certified.

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    Visit these pages for other equipment fitting information:

    Bauer Goalie Helmet Sizing Chart

    ModelSizeHead circumference
    ​ NME One ​S20.9 – 22″
    M21.7 – 22.8″
    L22.4 – 23.6″
    ​ Bauer 960 ​S20.9 – 22″
    M21.7 – 22.8″
    L22.4 – 23.6 “
    ​ Bauer 950 ​S20.9 – 22″
    M21.7 – 22.8″
    L22.4 – 23.6″
    ​Bauer 940Junior20.1 – 21.7″
    S20.9 – 22″
    M21.7 – 22.8″
    L22.4 – 23.6″
    Bauer 930Youth19.3 – 21.1″
    Junior20.1 – 21.9″
    S/M20.9 – 22.4″
    M/L22 – 23.6″

    CCM Goalie Helmet Sizing Chart

    ModelSizeHead Circumference
    ​Axis SeniorS20.9 – 22.5″
    M21.6 – 23.3″
    L22.5 – 24″
    XL23.3 – 24.8″
    ​ Axis 1.5 ​Youth19.3 – 22.9″
    Junior20.9 – 22.9″
    Senior22 – 23.6″

    Vaughn Goalie Helmet Sizing Chart

    SizeHead Circumference
    Junior20.1 – 21.3″
    Adult Medium21.3 – 22.8″
    Adult Large22.8 – 24.5″

    Warrior Goalie Helmet Sizing Chart

    ModelSizeHead Circumference
    R/F1 Pro, R/F1 Senior+S/M21.7 – 22.8″
    M/L22 – 23.2″
    L/XL22.4 – 23.6″
    R/F1 SeniorS/M21.7 – 23″
    M/L22 – 23.4″
    R/F1 Junior+, R/F1 JuniorJunior20.9 – 22.4″
    R/F1 YouthYouth19.3 – 21.3″

    Sportmask Goalie Helmet Sizing Chart

    SizeHead Circumference
    XS19.3 – 20.5″
    S20.5 – 22″
    M22 – 22.8″
    L22.8 – 23.8″
    XL23.8 – 24.8″

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